iLEAD Exploration Remains Open Virtually for Learners

iLEAD Exploration continues to operate its independent study model in an entirely virtual format. Click here for current information.

May 13, 2020 @ 07:00
10.25.2019

Learning Through Games

MM 9

It’s not a surprise for homeschoolers that learning through play is an excellent way to practice, comprehend, and master a subject. For English language learners, game play is highly beneficial. Learning through games is a low-stress, meaningful opportunity for learners to practice English. Game play offers learners the opportunity to use their language skills rather than think about whether they’re saying words and phrases correctly. When a learner is using their language skills, rather than thinking about their language skills, learners remember faster, better, and with more meaning. So break out the board games, card games, and computer games — and start playing!

Positive, Negative, and Interesting

Age Group: Teens

  1. Put learners in pairs if possible.
  2. Explain to the learners that they need to think about the positive, negative, and interesting points of an idea.
  3. Show the learners an idea statement (see below) and give them time to think of some positive, negative, and interesting aspects of the idea.

Statement Ideas:

People should be allowed to eat meat only once a week.
There should be an extra tax on unhealthy food.
Life would be better without government or rules.
All children should have the right to vote.
All children should speak only English in school.

Roll the Dice, Make a Question

Age Group: All levels

Write one to six on a piece of paper and a different question word (who? what? why? where? when? how?) next to it. When a learner rolls the dice, he or she needs to make a question with the corresponding question word. The learner then calls on a family member or friend to answer it.

Ship in the Fog Game

Age Group: All levels

Ship in the Fog is a fun and engaging way to practice directions with your learner. In this activity, a parent or another sibling makes an obstacle course in the house. A blindfolded learner must then complete the obstacle course while being given directions verbally by other family members. Players can take turns giving the directions and receiving directions.

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